Category: Aaron Brazell

  • Fact Checking in the Internet World

    Like many other industries, journalism has undergone a vast paradigm shift in the last decade. Like advertising, the music and film industries, marketing, public relations and virtually all other professional fields, journalism has had to adjust to a new “immediacy” brought about by the Internet. Now, by all reports, most people get their news from online sources and, while “online sources” are often venerable traditional media sources like the New York Times and the Washington Post, more often than not, blogs have become major sources of breaking news, and exclusive reports.

  • Convergence of technology, journalism and sports

    Sheer erudition — and erudition of a very specific type — throws up large barriers to entry. Too often, newer, younger, and more casual sports fans “can sort of get to a certain point of enthusiasm before they hit the ‘stat wall’ where discussion of sports becomes pedantic and quantitative for no discernible reason other […]

  • Making Decisions Inebriated

    “But the ancient Macedonians used to make important decisions only when inebriated, the idea being that only when mentally lubricated are you free of the societal filters and self-doubt. Therefore you think and act as your true self. Therefore you are thinking and acting truthfully, and hence correctly.” [via Jason Cohen]

  • You Can Never Take My Freedom

    The idea of increasing protections on the Internet to ensure that piracy plagiarism and other forms of intellectual property theft is sexy to content producers who attempt to eschew the freedoms provided by the Internet in the 21st century. Photographers don’t like to have their photos used without permission, often times. Legitimately so. But that doesn’t change the fact that photos are used without the permission of the photographer anyway. Regardless of protections currently in place or employed.

  • Osama, Closure

    Photo taken by theqspeaks This post is therapy for me. Twitter and the media have already done a fine job of reporting and I am intentionally 12 hours late. There’s no new information I can provide, nor do I wish to. Last night was important. It was important for the world, the United States and […]

  • Product is King. Content is Not.

    Remember the bad old days of blog networks. Like when I was at b5media championing the idea of content as the great savior of the Internet, the bellwether of future journalism, the dawn of an era of online advertising as the dominant (and only) truly valuable means of creating revenue online? Yeah… so about that. I was wrong.

  • The WordPress Bible

    A few months ago, I let you know that WordPress Bible: Second Edition was available for pre-order. That has changed. It is now out and available to be ordered. Amazon, as usual, is the best way to order it. This edition of my book has 60 new pages in it and covers up to WordPress 3.1. So all that stuff about post formats, custom post types, custom taxonomies, the merge of WordPress MU into WordPress as Multisite, the terminology changes… all of it…. covered in this book.

  • Venture Capital Irony, Bubbles and Booms

    Late in 2008, after the rest of the economy crashed and burned due to the housing crisis, the tech sector seemed to be fairly resiliant. Maybe it’s the nature of the industry… less money at stake, generally, in tech VC deals than other industries. For instance, Biotech. That all went out the window when Valley-based VC behemoth, Sequoia Capital, gathered a now-infamous meeting of all its portfolio companies and gave them what can only be described as a “the sky is falling” lecture.

  • SXSW Protips

    This will be my fifth SXSW interactive. It’s also, notably, the first SXSW that I am an Austinite. Since SXSW starts next week, the usual flood of tweets asking for advice or emails asking me to provide tips or asking me to be their guide began. It started earlier this year (back in January) than in years past. I’m chalking that up to the fact that I’m also living in Austin and am expected to “know the ropes”. Trust me. I do. On Austin and on SXSW.

  • AOL, 2006 Called and Wants Its Content Commoditization Strategy Back…

    It was a Monday like any other Monday. After a weekend of too much drinking, low-key football-centric Sunday celebrations (Go Packers!) and an early night to bed, I woke up this morning in the way I normally do on a Monday: Cursing ye gods of Mondays past, and hoping the day would not turn into the inevitable case of the Mondays that they all do. Wearily, I reached for my laptop to find out what the Monday morning tech news buzz was and my eyes flew open in surprise: AOL had acquired the Huffington Post for $315M in a hybrid cash and stock transaction. This only a few months after TechCrunch had been acquired, also by AOL, for an undisclosed amount.